30 Day Decluttering Challenge - 2017

30 Day Decluttering Challenge - 2017

This is seriously my most favorite time of the year.  I love hearing from you all every day and seeing what clutter you're removing from your home (and life!) in order to make more room for what's important (hint: it's not the stuff).  

You'll also be entered to win a free session with Amy or myself ($399 value) or a month of phone coaching with me if you're not in the area. 

30 day simple challenge = 1 entry into drawing

Mins Game = 2 entries

Having an Clutter Buddy = 4 entries

Doing the Mins Game with a Clutter Buddy = 5 entries

Simple Challenge: ......

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What I Learned from My Capsule Wardrobe

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Capsule Wardrobe.  

Project 333.  

A uniform.  

These were all buzzwords in 2016 and being as I suffer from a healthy dose of FOMO, I thought I would try one and see what all the fuss is about.  

The basic premise is that rather than buying the skinniest hangers possible so you can cram more clothes in your closet, you clear the damn thing out and only put back a few items.  It could be 33 items every 3 months in the case of Project 333, or just 5 shirts and 5 pants, all the same, for The Uniform.  The mellow choice was a generic Capsule Wardrobe in which you just choose a "limited" amount of clothing. 

After attempting Project 333, and landing closer to Project 666, I decided to just call my attempt by the generic name: Capsule Wardrobe. I pulled out all the clothes from my closet, put back the ones I loved and put the rest in two bins in the garage. 

Here's what I learned:

1.  Having 1 pair of pants a la The Minimalists would only work for me were I willing to do laundry every day.  I get dirty working in peoples homes and, do to health issues, need to wear a new pair almost every day so that I'm not marinating in allergens.  That would add up to a lot of washing and I just don't have the bandwidth right now for that. 

2. Ditto for shirts.  On top of the allergens, I'm just a rather sweaty, smelly person.  For the sake of those around me, I stick to a single use of a shirt, and even then, my hippy-dippy non-aluminum deodorant leaves a bit to be desired.  If a weekend with my horse is involved, that also necessitates a change of shirts (and pants).  I think he smells wonderful, but I get looks when I go to the store after visiting him. I could feasibly stick to just 2 or 3 shirts, but that too would lean towards a ridiculous amount of washing each week.  That leads us to the next point...  

About 25 shirts and 5 pairs of pants make up my fall/winter wardrobe.  Half the shirts are for really cold days and half are for just slightly chilly days.  

About 25 shirts and 5 pairs of pants make up my fall/winter wardrobe.  Half the shirts are for really cold days and half are for just slightly chilly days.  

 

3.  Although I default to wearing black tank tops while at home, I realized I actually enjoy having a bit of a choice in my work shirts.  This was a surprise as I really didn't think I cared that much, but some days I feel like a blue shirt, others a purple one.  The key was keeping the choice to a minimum.   

4.  Getting dressed is SO much easier with a smaller collection. I haven't had a single "OMG I have NOTHING to wear" day since the big clean out. 

5. Moving is easier.  If you have to move to a new home, only needing one little wardrobe box is a huge perk.  We found that out in November. 

My fall/winter shoes.  The sandals and 2 pairs of high heels live on an upper shelf until summer.

My fall/winter shoes.  The sandals and 2 pairs of high heels live on an upper shelf until summer.

6. Co-habitating is easier.  If you move and wind up having to share a closet with your partner, you will have fewer fights if your clothing is staying firmly in your half of the closet.  At least, that's how it went down in our house. :)

7.  Sometimes the biggest act of self-love is letting go of too-small clothes or buying a size larger.  Not with the attitude that nothing can be done about your weight, but an attitude of compassion, i.e. "due to XY and Z, this is the weight I am right now".  I let go of some old pants, bought a couple pair of pants I could wear right now, and ironically lost a little weight.  There might be something to this self-love and acceptance.  Another bonus, in letting go of the too-small clothes, and a few that I just wasn't in love with, I was able to whittle down my 2 boxes of clothes in the garage to 1.  

 

PS If this article helps you, please consider hitting the <3 or share button.  Thanks!  

PPS What I Learned from my Capsule Wardrobe and Simple Luxury

5 Ways to Tame Your Kitchen Today

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1.  Gather up all of your Tupperware-style food storage containers.  Match the lids.  Recycle any that don't match or are chipped, broken or otherwise damaged.  Pare down.  Most of my clients could cut their collections in half and still have plenty.  Consider switching to glass - it's BPA free and doesn't stain.

2.  Go through your pantry and toss any expired cans, boxes and jars.  Pay close attention to spices, snack foods and cans.  I find that these are often expired.  Many cans are lined with plastic that contains BPA.  If you are going to use canned food, look for ones that say "BPA free" on the label.  

3.  Grab a paper shopping bag or box and clear off your counter of anything that isn't kitchen or food related or that you haven't used in the past month.  Put this bag in the garage for 2 weeks and see if you miss anything.  If not, you have permission to recycle it all.  If there are important papers on your counters, put those in your office, not the garage. :) 

4.  Give the refrigerator a quick once over - toss anything that's getting funky or growing more mold than a shot of penicillin.  Please recycle the empty jars.  Once you've composted any questionable food, give the shelves a quick wipe down with a 50/50 vinegar and water spray. 

5.  Open your utensil drawers and toss any packets of soy sauce, salt, pepper and the like, as well as any plastic cutlery.  Give the gadgets a once over while you're looking in there.  Most restaurant kitchens rely on knives, cutting boards, a can opener and skillets to create any number of tasty meal.  Chances are, you don't really need 80% of the gadgets in there.